ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate Reviews

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ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate
By Derek Peterson
May 30, 2013

With 8 grams of powder per serving, ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate should have quite a few exercise-enhancing ingredients.

But, exactly how is ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate said to benefit exercise? Its ads claim it produces all of the following benefits:

• Boost energy
• Build muscle
• Provide antioxidants
• Taste great

Those advertised benefits are nothing special for a pre-workout supplement. Still, it’s worth investigating ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate’s specifics to judge its value as a pre-workout supplement.

Who Makes It?

ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate is made by Vitacost.com. Vitacost.com both manufactures and sells a variety of health and wellness products and supplements. Vitacost.com began selling ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate in May 2013, but the company has been in business since 1994.

On the Better Business Bureau website, Vitacost.com earns an A+ rating. This rating is partially due to Vitacost.com’s nearly 20 years in business and its openness about company history and background.

However, it’s hard to overlook the 253 complaints filed against Vitacost.com in the last 3 years. These complaints stem from a variety of causes, including advertising and sales issues, billing issues, and delivery issues.

How does Vitacost.com maintain its A+ rating with so many complaints? For one, the BBB reports Vitacost.com is good at resolving consumer complaints. Usually this is done by offering refunds or replacements. For another, the BBB notes this is a typical complaint volume for a company of this size.

It seems ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate is made and sold by a fairly trustworthy company.

What’s in It?

ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate enhances workouts with amino acids, creatine, caffeine, and other natural ingredients. Let’s see check each one for its potential exercise-enhancing effects.

Beta-Alanine
Quite a few scientific studies show the amino acid beta-alanine improves physical performance. For example, participants in one study had significantly increased muscular endurance after taking beta-alanine for 6 weeks. [1]

Creatine Monohydrate
Creatine monohydrate is used to build muscles and improve athleticism. [2] In studies, both men and women demonstrated increased athletic power after using creatine monohydrate. [3]

Arginine Alpha-Ketoglutarate (AAKG)
The amino acid arginine form is a known nitric oxide precursor. That means it speeds up nutrient delivery to muscles. When taken with creatine, AAKG improves muscle endurance and power. [4]

Tyrosine
According to several studies, the amino acid tyrosine improves memory during stress. [5] Current research shows no effects on exercise performance. [6]

Enzyme Blend

Caffeine Anhydrous (200 mg)
Caffeine is well-established as an energy booster. In addition, research shows caffeine reduces pain and increases endurance in some types of exercise. [7]

Eleuthero Extract
This ingredient is Siberian ginseng, a common remedy for various stressors. Unfortunately, it has no proven effects on exercise. [8]

Rhodiola Extract
Rhodiola is an herb used to reduce stress and improve athleticism. A preliminary study indicates rhodiola benefits mental function in certain stressful situations. [9]

Guarana
Guarana is a natural caffeine source. Research shows guarana aids memory along with boosting energy. [10]

Green Tea Extract
Green tea contains polyphenols. These natural chemicals are believed to protect joints against inflammation and breakdown. Green tea also contains small caffeine amounts. [11]

Cocoa Extract
Cocoa extract contains antioxidants called flavonoids. [12] A few studies indicate cocoa’s flavonoids protect the cardiovascular system. [13]

Green Coffee Bean Extract
Green coffee bean extract’s effects on exercise come from its caffeine content. Some scientists believe it induces weight loss. But, this is not proven. [14]

Yerba Mate Extract
Yerba mate’s most active component is also caffeine. Consequently, ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate contains this ingredient to boost energy and reduce fatigue.

ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate’s amino acids and creatine have the most direct effect on exercise. With at least 4 caffeine sources, the enzyme blend is mostly for boosting energy. Its non-caffeine ingredients probably have little exercise or energy benefit.

How Much Does It Cost?

Vitacost.com sells ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate for $19.99. A single jug comes with 30 servings. That makes the price per serving approximately $0.66.

At that cost, ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate is a pretty inexpensive pre-workout supplement.

What Are It’s Usage Directions?

One ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate serving is approximately 8 grams powder. The scoop provided in the jar measures this amount. Mix 1 scoop with 8 ounces water and drink. It is safe to have up to 3 servings daily.

Further warnings on the label remind users this product has the same caffeine content as 2 cups of coffee. Consequently, users should monitor and limit additional caffeine consumption while using ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate.

Can ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate Pump Up Your Workout?

ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate contains a decent mix of amino acids, creatine, and caffeine sources. All of these ingredients provide some workout benefits. But, their effects likely vary depending on workout type and intensity.

The biggest detractor from this product’s value is its high caffeine content. ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate has at least 4 caffeine sources, including 200 mg pure caffeine. The label clearly indicates this, but some consumers prefer lower caffeine content. If the caffeine content doesn’t bother you, ARO Black Series Pre-Workout Concentrate might be worth a try.

References

[1] Smith, AE, AA Walter, et al. “Effects of beta-alanine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on endurance performance and body composition in men; a double-blind trial.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 6.5 (2009).

[2] Medline Plus. “Creatine.” 2012 Dec 26.

[3] Tarnopolsky, MA, and DP MacLennon. “Creatine monohydrate supplementation enhances high-intensity exercise performance in males and females.” International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 10.4 (2000): 452-63.

[4] Little, JP, SC Forbes, et al. “Creatine, arginine alpha-ketoglutarate, amino acids, and medium-chain triglycerides and endurance and performance.” International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 18.5 (2008): 493-508.

[5] Deijen, JB, CJ Wientjes, et al. “Tyrosine improves cognitive performance and reduces blood pressure in cadets after one week of a combat training course.” Brain Research Bulletin. 48.2 (1999): 203-9.

[6] Chinevere, TD, RD Sawyer, et al. “Effects of L-tyrosine and carbohydrate ingestion on endurance exercise performance.” Journal of Applied Physiology. 93.5 (2002): 1590-7.

[7] Davis, JK, JM Green. “Caffeine and anaerobic performance: ergogenic value and mechanisms of action.” Sports Medicine. 39.10 (2009): 813-32.

[8] Medline Plus. “Ginseng, Siberian.” 2012 Aug 2.

[9] Darbinyan, V, A Kteyan, et al. “Rhodiola rosea in stress induced fatigue–a double blind cross-over study of a standardized extract SHR-5 with a repeated low-dose regimen on the mental performance of healthy physicians during night duty.” Phytomedicine. 7.5 (2000): 365-71.

[10] Haskell, CF, et al. “A double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-dose evaluation of the acute behavioral effects of guarana in humans.” Journal of Psychopharmacology. (2006).

[11] WebMD. “Green Tea.”

[12] Spadafranca, A, C Martinez Conesa, et al. “Effect of dark chocolate on plasma epicatechin levels, DNA resistance to oxidative stress and total antioxidant activity in healthy subjects.” Journal of Nutrition. 103.7 (2010): 1008-14.

[13] Fisher, N, M. Hughes, et al. “Flavanol-rich cocoa induces nitric-oxide dependent vasodilation in healthy humans.” Journal of Hypertension. 21.12 (2003): 2281-6.

[14] WebMD. “Green Coffee.”

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