Concentrated Pre-Workout

86%
Excellent pre-workout option

I like PreGains. While it’s a bit expensive, the ingredients are solid, and there isn’t anything hidden.

Because of the cost, I wouldn’t use PreGains as an everyday pre-workout, but it could be a great choice for those that don’t mind spending a little more. Personally, I’ll keep it on the shelf for my heavier lifting days.

  • Ingredient Quality
  • Ingredient Transparency
  • Price
  • Taste and Mixability
  • Value

The Hodge Twins are venturing into new territory. The Internet-famous duo who created the phrase “All Kind of Gains” have started to release supplements. They have 2 options so far, a creatine and a pre-workout.

The creatine formula is just a creatine monohydrate, nothing too ground-breaking. However, the pre-workout is a bit more interesting.

It’s called PreGains, and they claim it is ultra-concentrated, so you only need 1 scoop to get an effective dose.

I’m very skeptical of pre-workouts. I’ve tried too many that didn’t work or were just dressed-up caffeine powders with obfuscated ingredient blends.

Thankfully, the Hodge Twins have made the ingredient label available on their website, so we can do a full evaluation.

What’s Inside?

Beta Alanine – 3 g

Beta alanine is must-have for a high-quality pre-workout. This amino acid increases muscle contraction power and improve post workout recovery.

Agmatine Sulfate – 1.5 g

Another pre-workout staples, agmatine is popular because of its Vasodilating and nitric oxide-boosting properties. This makes it a powerful pump increaser, improving blood flow and nutrient transport to the muscles.

Agmatine sulfate also plays a role in protein synthesis, helping muscles recovery after exercise.

N-Acetyl Tyrosine – 500 mg

N-acetyl tyrosine is a neurotransmitter. It improves focus during workouts.

Caffeine – 260 mg

Caffeine is the king of pre-workout ingredients. You’re probably already familiar with it from your morning coffee or your favorite energy drink.

Caffeine works by inhibiting adenosine binding in the brain. This prevents your body from feeling fatigue, which allows you to work harder and longer.

Because it also boost adrenaline and dopamine production, caffeine contributes to overall feelings of well-being.

Most pre-workout products contain between 100 and 200 mg of caffeine. PreGains gives you 260 mg. That’s a lot of caffeine, which might cause problems if you’re sensitive to stimulants.

Schisandra – 100 mg

I have never seen this plant extract in a pre-workout before, but it’s always nice to see new technologies and research used.

Studies show schisandra contributes to increased physical performance and healthy blood sugar.

Advantra Z – 20 mg

Advantra Z is a patented form of the bitter orange extract. It’s usually used as a fat burner because it boosts metabolism and therefore energy levels.

How Much Does It Cost?

PreGains is available for $40 from the Hodge Twins website. For a 20-serving container, that’s $2/serving, which isn’t outlandish but is definitely on the expensive side for a pre-workout.

How’s The Taste?

There is only one available flavor: Blue Raspberry. I thought it was decent enough, nothing special. It mixed well, and there wasn’t any powder residue when I finished.

Is It Worth It?

I like PreGains. While it’s a bit expensive, the ingredients are solid, and there isn’t anything hidden.

Because of the cost, I wouldn’t use PreGains as an everyday pre-workout, but it could be a great choice for those that don’t mind spending a little more. Personally, I’ll keep it on the shelf for my heavier lifting days.

Have you tried PreGains? What do you think about it? Let us know in the comments.

References

[1] Hobson RM, et al. “Effects of β-alanine supplementation on exercise performance: a meta-analysis.” Amino Acids. 2012 July; 43(1): 25–37.

[2] Wu G, Morris SM, “Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.” Journal of Biochemistry. 1998 November 15; 336(Pt 1): 1–17.

[3] “N-Acetyl L-Tyrosine.” PubChem. U.S. National Library of Medicine.

[4] Goldstein Erica, et al. “International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2010, 7:5

[5] Hancke J, Burgos R, and Caceres D. “Reduction of serum hepatic transaminases and CPK in sport horses with poor performance treated with a standardized Schizandra chinensi fruit extract.” Phytomedicine 1996;3:237-240.

[6] Fugh-Berman A, Myers A. “Citrus aurantium, an ingredient of dietary supplements marketed for weight loss: current status of clinical and basic research.” Experimental Biology and Medicine. 2004 Sep;229(8):698-704.