Energy & Pump

80%
Great

True Grit Pre is formulated with effective ingredients. I think that is the biggest deal when considering a pre-workout supplement, that and if it is under dosed or not. If you take 2 scoops of True Grit Pre, you will be getting these ingredients in their clinically-studied doses.

True Grit Pre may not work for everyone, however. But, it is affordable. Considering the ingredients and price per bottle, I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend this pre-workout.

  • Value
  • Effectiveness
  • Taste
  • Mixability
  • Ingredients

True Grit Pre is a pre-workout supplement designed to improve workout performance and results by enhancing energy, blood-flow, and buffer lactic acid.

A quick glimpse of the ingredient profile caught my attention right away. I took a closer look at everything there is to know about True Grit Pre to see if it is an effective pre-workout.

Ingredients

True Grit Pre includes several ingredients in its formula. One thing to notice is that dosing information is available. It may not seem like a big deal, but many companies utilize proprietary blends to hide ingredient information. The fact that True Grit Pre doesn’t hold back any information is a plus in my book.

Here’s a look at some main ingredients in True Grit Pre’s formula:

Beta-Alanine (CarnoSyn) (1.6 g)

This ingredient is used to improve physical performance by delaying muscle fatigue. Researched doses include anywhere from 3.2-6.4 g per day. [1]

The amount of beta-alanine in one serving of True Grit Pre is smaller than the studied dose range, but just enough if you mix 2 scoops. You should notice similar workout-improving benefits from the beta-alanine content in True Grit Pre.

Betaine (1.25 g)

Betaine, also referred to as trimethylglycine, is studied for its ability to attenuate lactate production so you exercise for longer, getting in additional reps and sets for more muscle growth.

One study shows a 2.5 g betaine concoction was able to combat lactate production, which resulted in an increase of total reps and total volume load in a 10-set bench press protocol. [2]

There is enough betaine in 2 servings of True Grit Pre to produce similar advantages.

Arginine Silica Inositol (750 mg)

Arginine has been shown to convert into a chemical called nitric oxide, which increases blood flow. [3] This action is something of interest to bodybuilders and gym goers who want to maximize blood flow to their muscles for improved muscle pumps.

Unfortunately, I was unable to find an effective, studied dose in regard to weight-training supplementation.

Caffeine Anhydrous (170 mg)
Caffeine is used to increase power output during exercise.

During one study, thirteen moderately trained men supplemented with 5 mg caffeine per 1 kg of bodyweight and a placebo. Research reveals more weight and more reps to failure were accomplished with caffeine supplementation when compared to the placebo. [4]

Depending on your bodyweight and whether you supplement with 1 or 2 scoops of True Grit Pre, there should be enough caffeine to aid your resistance training.

How to Take True Grit Pre

You can mix 1-2 scoops with 6-12 oz. of water about 20 minutes before your workout. I recommend starting with the smallest dose possible, as this does contain about 175 mg of caffeine per serving. If you aren’t used to caffeine’s stimulatory effects or don’t respond well to caffeine, 2 scoops could simply be too much to handle.

When possible, I suggest taking True Grit Pre on a somewhat empty stomach. If you pound a huge pre-workout meal 30 minutes before your workout and then mix 1-2 scoops of True Grit Pre after, it will take longer for your body to digest, and it may take a prolonged period of time for you to feel the ergogenic effects.

If you generally do eat a pre-workout meal, I suggest eating it at least 1 hour before working out, that way you can give yourself enough time to take True Grit Pre before your training and have it digest optimally.

Where Can You Buy True Grit Pre?

True Grit Pre is exclusive to Bodybuilding.com.

One bottle provides 30 servings and retails for $34. True Grit Pre comes in a Fruit Punch and Watermelon flavor.

I tried the fruit punch flavor. It tasted like a sweet fruit punch. I’m not the biggest fan of fruit punch flavor in any form. I feel that it is a bit overdone. However, this flavor wasn’t terrible. It was sweet, and I didn’t notice any strange after taste, and most importantly, it tasted like Fruit Punch. If you don’t mind fruit punch flavors, you definitely won’t mind this.

I mixed it in a shaker cup for about 15 seconds with 8 oz. of water. It mixed fairly well. There was some slight settling at the bottom but nothing major.

The price per serving is about average of many pre-workout supplements. However, if you find you need to take 2 scoops every workout, you’ll burn through a container fast, and that might become expensive in the long run.

Final Thoughts

True Grit Pre is formulated with effective ingredients. I think that is the biggest deal when considering a pre-workout supplement, that and if it is under dosed or not. If you take 2 scoops of True Grit Pre, you will be getting these ingredients in their clinically-studied doses.

True Grit Pre may not work for everyone, however. But, it is affordable. Considering the ingredients and price per bottle, I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend this pre-workout.

References

[1] Beta Alanine. WebMD. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-1222-beta-alanine.aspx?activeingredientid=1222&activeingredientname=beta-alanine

[2] Trepanowski JF et al. “The effects of chronic supplementation on exercise performance, skeletal muscle oxygen saturation and associated biochemical parameters in resistance trained men.” J Strength Cond Res. 2011 Dec;25(12):3461-71. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318217d48d. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22080324

[3] L-Arginine. WebMD. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-875-l-arginine.aspx?activeingredientid=875&activeingredientname=l-arginine

[4] Duncan MJ, Oxford SW. “The effect of caffeine ingestion on mood state and bench press performance to failure.” J Strength Cond Res. 2011 Jan;25(1):178-85. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e318201bddb. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21157384